The Terrelle Pryor in the NFL Debate… Yes, There Is Life After College Football

Read the opposing argument from Bleacher Fan.

Life gave Terrelle Pryor lemons, and earlier this week he started making lemonade.

Well maybe that’s not entirely accurate. Perhaps it could be better stated that, life blessed Terrelle Pryor with incredible athletic gifts and placed him in an extremely enviable position to showcase those talents, and then his greed and ego caused the downfall of his career, his coach’s job, and his college football team’s chances for the immediate future….but really isn’t it just a matter of semantics?

In spite of his marred reputation and indiscretions, Terrelle Pryor has a lot of upside left to his football career and now he’s trying to start fresh in the NFL. He is off to a great start by signing the best agent in sports, Drew Rosenhaus . Seriously, I mean that. Rosenhaus could sell crazy pills to Gary Busey. But I digress.

So now, armed with the apex predator of all agents and a new penitent attitude, Pryor throws his hat in the ring for the NFL supplemental draft. Today’s debate examines the question, does Pryor warrant a shot of making an NFL teams roster following selection in the supplemental draft?

The answer is a resounding YES! Terrelle Pryor is an obvious talent, maybe not a prototypical NFL quarterback, but a football talent none the less. There is hardly a debate on this issue at all.

If this debate was about whether teams should build a franchise around Pryor, then I would admit that would be some obvious concerns for NFL General Managers to consider. And again, if this debate was about whether teams should spend a first round pick in the supplemental draft on him, I would acknowledge the fact that there are just too many questions for this to be a no brainer. BUT, neither of those are the issues Bleacher Fan and I are asked to tackle. We simply have to decide whether Terrelle Pryor, a stand out QB from the ultra competitive Big Ten, deserves a potentially mid to late round draft pick to then compete for a spot on the team roster. I simply cannot see any justification for teams to overlook him in such a low risk high reward scenario.

First of all, Terrelle Pryor is not a seriously bad guy. He didn’t shoot himself in the leg at a strip club like Plaxico Burress. He didn’t fight and kill dogs for pleasure like Michael Vick. He didn’t allegedly sexually assault multiple women like Ben Roethlisberger. No, Pryor did what more modern athletes than we’d probably care to admit do year after year. He took benefits that an amateur athlete cannot receive. We saw this play out on a much higher profile scenario with Reggie Bush last year which ended up costing him the most noteworthy of his amateur accolades, the Heisman Trophy. It was a black eye for Bush and his former college the University of Southern California but not so much for his pro team the New Orleans Saints. Sure the scandal was a distraction but it didn’t really seem to impact the day to day success of Saints football. Pryor is sure to carry some distraction and baggage to any team that signs, but it will be more of a hiccup in his integration to the pro game than a barrier to playing winning football. So while Pryor may not bring the drama and problems of a Vick or Roethlisberger he may bring some of their talent and athleticism.

Secondly, what do teams have to lose at this point? The supplemental draft works similarly to a silent auction that allows teams to declare what round they would be willing to take Pryor, and then surrender a pick in the following year’s draft if they have the highest bid. This means that any team could take a flyer on him with a seventh round bid. While I feel certain that won’t win him, it does mean that any team in the league could snatch a mobile quarterback to come in and fight for a roster spot. There are plenty of teams that still have holes at the QB position and many more that could stand to bolster their bench with proficient signal caller with the skills of Pryor.

This whole debate centers on the question of whether teams should take Pryor, but it is really a given that they will. The debate should really have been about determining the round he WILL be drafted. Drew Rosenhaus is prognosticating that his latest client will go in the first round. While I believe this is more posturing and price inflation than true projection, I would not rule it out that he will go for a pick in the top half of the draft.

Solving the QB concerns was an issue for many teams in the 2011 NFL Draft. Cam Newton, Blaine Gabbert, Jake Locker, and Christian Ponder were all taken in the 1st round. While Pryor’s name certainly rivals one or two of these quarterbacks, the point here is that he doesn’t even have to. Pryor simply needs to demand enough attention to demand one draft pick from one team for me to win this debate, and I believe that is a given. The Texans, Jets, Ravens, Bears, and Chiefs all used late round picks trying to better their QB situation. It would be crazy to believe these are the only teams than need to strengthen their passing game, and it would be even more ludicrous to believe that all NFL teams are satisfied with the rosters.

I feel certain that Bleacher Fan will rattle off a laundry list of character defects and skill deficiencies that would cause teams to doubt Pryor’s effectiveness as a pro QB, but all draftees face similar second-guessing and scrutiny. If that was really enough to deter NFL GMs, Cam Newton would not have been the overall first pick in the draft.

Pryor may not pan out to be a star, but he certainly deserves a chance to prove he can be one.

My Zimbio Blog Directory Sport Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
Add us to your technorati favorites Digg!
Bookmark and Share

About these ads

2 Responses to The Terrelle Pryor in the NFL Debate… Yes, There Is Life After College Football

  1. […] the opposing argument from Babe Ruthless. View This Pollonline […]

  2. […] the opposing arguments from Babe Ruthless and Bleacher Fan. View This Pollonline […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: